Eclipse News

The 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Brings Everyone Together

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Half a billion people.

That is the number of people in the US, Canada and Mexico that will have the opportunity to witness the partial solar eclipse on August 21st.  The actual number is impossible to pinpoint, being subject to a number of variables, not the least of which is the weather at any given location on eclipse day.

Trying to guesstimate the number of people who will travel to the zone of totality is a much more difficult prospect – just ask any number of state police, emergency management, city planning and transportation department personnel trying to judge the impact on their resources.  We do know this – about 10 million people live in the zone, about three times that amount live within sixty miles of it, and if we expand out to people living within a day’s drive the number of people expands to about a third of the US population, or about 110 million people.  This number includes cities like Seattle, Eugene, Boise, Denver, Omaha, Des Moines, Chicago, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Washington DC, etc.  Throw in international travelers, organized trips and statistical variance, the total solar eclipse of August 21st will approach Super Bowl audiences.  Isn’t that the standard by which all audiences are measured?

 

Dawgs On A Limb

One hundred million people. 

That is the number the dawgs are going with for live total eclipse viewership.  Is this based on hard statistics?  No.  Is this number arrived at using sound scientific principles?  Hardly.  Would the dawgs testify to the validity of this number in a court of law, or one of public opinion?  Not on your life.

The eclipse is potentially, at least for the partial part of it, the largest “live” audience to view anything, ever.  There have been televised events with larger viewerships for sure, but these are a different type of “live”, right?  Satellites, optical cables, cable boxes and live internet streaming were required for these massive events but the eclipse requires only your eyeballs.  And Scopedawg Optics safe solar glasses, of course, although we don’t have one hundred million pairs in stock, much less half a billion.

Various sources: Worldometers.info, Worldlistmania.com, Wikipedia

The Wyoming News estimates the population of that state (535,000) could double on August 21st and The Bend Bulletin reports the same for the Central Oregon Valley (220,000).  Towns like Carbondale, Hopkinsville and Casper are anticipating minimums of 100,000 avid eclipse fans.

 

Dawgs To The Rescue

And exactly where will all these people go to glimpse totality?  In a previous post – Got Plans? we encouraged folks to start formulating their plans, especially in light of booked hotel rooms and campsites, and that was way back in March.  Even those planning on winging it will need to consult weather maps, traffic patterns and road maps.  Never fear, the dawgs are here.

We have recently prettied up our homepage to make it easier to access the incredible resources (our emphasis, FYI) we have for eclipse chasers.  In addition to Odie’s Eclipse Maps, giving you detailed information on best places to see the eclipse in every state, we have added Odie’s Eclipse Links.  This links tool will get you to the websites of hundreds of festivals, parties, astronomy clubs, universities, state parks – and much more- in every state, from coast to coast.

The Scopedawg Optics commitment to providing practical information and useful products does not end there.  In about a week the Scopedawg Eclipse Photography Guide will make its debut on the homepage.  The Photo Guide will offer cheat sheets, tips and techniques and Spectrum Telescope filters for binoculars / telescopes / camera lenses.  The dawgs will link you to equipment manufacturers and dealers, books and articles on eclipse photography, software and weather websites, and much more.

Check it out.

 

The stars about the lovely moon
Fade back and vanish very soon,
When, round and full, her silver face
Swims into sight, and lights all space

Sappho, Greek Poet from Lesbos
630 – 570 BC
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